Data Privacy Blog Posts

Why do I need a Privacy Policy?

Data privacy is a topic that is of growing concern to many consumers around the U.S. and you may have heard the term privacy policy a time or two in recent history but haven’t paid it much mind. If your just getting into digital marketing or are updating an existing marketing site you may be […]

One Way Hash Functions and Data Privacy Compliance.

This article will discuss how a one way hash function can be used in the context of privacy compliance for regulations like the GDPR. Storing customer’s personal data is an inevitability for scaling businesses in today’s technical world. One way hash functions are a useful tool to store sensitive customer data such as passwords and […]

GDPR Principles: Accuracy

The accuracy principle states that controllers and processor should make reasonable efforts to ensure personal data is accurate.  They must allow citizens to challenge the accuracy of data and take steps to rectify or erase the data associated with the challenge.  Verification is sometimes needed to ensure data is accurate.  Controllers and processors should consider the impact to the individual and whether they collected the data or the user provided it when determining appropriate verification steps.  Organizations should document challenges and their responses thoroughly and in a timely manner. They should also document the thought process for determining whether personal data needs to be verified and the verification steps taken if necessary.

SAR Portal – Privacy Definitions

The GDPR and subsequent chain of privacy laws passed in countries around the world have resulted in a slough of new lingo for privacy professionals and IT professionals to learn.  One of these new terms is the SAR portal.  SAR portal stands for Subject Access Request portal.  Many of the new privacy laws grants certain rights to the citizens of their countries that allow them to make certain requests to businesses and other organizations that collect and process personal data.  The types of rights that are granted to citizens varies from country to country.  Some example requests that can be made are….

GDPR Principles: Data Minimization

Data minimization is the concept of collecting the minimum amount of data needed to carry out the stated purpose and no more.  When conducting a data minimization evaluation you must ensure that the data collected is adequate and relevant to your stated purpose as well as limited. The onus is on the organization to document compliance with this principle.  We recommend documenting a review of this principle each time new personal data is collected or processed.  Conduct at least an annual audit of personal data that has been collected or processed to ensure that changes in the business have not impacted compliance with the data minimization principle.

GDPR Principles: Purpose Limitation

The GDPR’s purpose limitation principle constrains the use of personal data to the original purposes or those purposes compatible with the original purpose.  There are a handful of pre-approved compatible purposes such as archiving purposes in the public interest, scientific and historical purposes, and statistical purposes. Under the GDPR, the burden falls on controllers and processors to document their purposes and reasoning behind them.  These must be documented externally to be transparent to the end user, and internally with regular audits. Care must be taken when deciding a purpose is compatible with the original.  An analysis must be conducted to determine compatibility and it’s a good idea to document the reasoning behind claiming a purpose is compatible with the original. Make sure to consider linkages to the original purpose, and consequences to the end user.

GDPR Principles: Lawfulness, Fairness and Transparency

The first principle of the GDPR, Lawfulness Fairness and Transparency focuses mostly on the underlying reasons for collecting and processing personal information and how it will be used.  It outlines the need for a lawful basis for processing and discusses the 6 bases for processing that have been identified. The bases of consent is the most recommend basis and organizations would do well to ensure they establish proper consent collection mechanisms.  It ensures that data is collected fairly and that the collection does not present unjust injury to an individual or group of individuals, regardless of how many other individuals are unaffected.  It ensures that organizations are being transparent in the way they inform their users on the type of information that is collected and the way it will be processed and used.  The responsibility lies within the collecting organization to document compliance with principles of the GDPR.  Establishing a process for documenting a lawful basis for processing, fairness, and transparency in collection will leave organization prepared for regulatory scrutiny, help avoid lawsuits and fines.  

SteadyHOPS and the GDPR

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and Data Protection Act of 2018 (DPA) are complex, in depth, complementary legal documents which act as a code of conduct for businesses involved in the processing of personal data.  Henceforth these regulations will be referred to as the GDPR. There are many aspects of compliance with these regulations and the best place to keep up to date and understand aspects of compliance is the Information Commissioner’s Office’s (ICO) Guide to General Data Protection Regulation.  This article highlights the aspects of compliance that SteadyHOPS provides.

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